Morley Vetcentre
20 Rudloc Rd
Morley, WA, 6062

info@vetcentre.com.au
www.vetcentre.com.au
Phone: 08 9275 3000
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Dr Marty is in the running to be the next TV Bondi Vet!! 

FORGET the white sands of Bondi Beach, Morley’s streets could play host to the next Bondi Vet television series.

Morley Vetcentre vet Marty Wray (28) has thrown his stethoscope into the ring and hopes to bring stories of Morley’s pets to the small screen.

Murdoch University graduate Dr Wray said a chance to bring the show to Perth would be “amazing”.

“The opportunity to go to Perth Zoo, wildlife sanctuaries, would be really cool and show off our clients in Morley and share their stories,” he said.

“I thought ‘Vet in the West’ could be a good name maybe.”

The UK and New Zealand-raised vet said he has met some very interesting people and pets during his three years at the Morley centre.

“You just never know day-to-day what’s going to happen or walk through the door,” he said.

“Yesterday we had three emergencies come in so you have to think on your toes.”

Dr Wray said he mainly cared for cats and dogs, as well as rabbits and guinea pigs and a couple of native creatures like snakes.

According to WTFN, the nation’s favourite would receive a program development deal, the first step to starring in a show.

On the Bondi Vet website, Dr Wray is currently ranked most popular.

To vote go to https://bondivet.com/vet-search/marty-wray

(Article  Eastern Reporter) 

dr marty bondivet
Contents of this newsletter

01  Is your pet a senior citizen?

02  Help your senior pet stay happy and healthy

03  My dog's done his knee!

04  Flu season is here

01 Is your pet a senior citizen?
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Is your pet starting to age a little?

Did you know that cats and dogs are considered senior citizens after the age around 8 years? As they reach their golden years there are a few things you need to watch out for.

Obvious changes might include:

  • forgetting toilet training
  • hearing loss
  • stiff legs
  • weight loss or gain

It's crucial to arrange more regular check ups with us during these senior years.

We will monitor your pet closely for:

  • sore joints
  • new lumps
  • dental disease
  • vision changes
  • heart changes

We may also suggest blood tests, urine tests and blood pressure measurements to make sure your pet's organs are all healthy. Diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and arthritis can be successfully managed if detected early.

Ask us for more information about keeping your senior pet happy and healthy. 

02 Help your senior pet stay happy and healthy
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Caring for a senior pet is an important job and your furry friends are relying on you to guide them through their twilight years.

Here are our top three tips for senior care:

1. Keep your eyes open for changes in behaviour, weight, appetite, thirst and urination. The presence of a cough, a change in sleeping habits, stiff joints, a new lump and accidents around the house can all be a sign of underlying illness. Instead of putting these changes down to 'getting old' arrange a check up with us.

2. Choose a premium diet suitable for a mature pet. These help to maintain ideal body condition and will improve longevity. Ask us for a specific recommendation for your pet.

3. As mentioned above, a regular health check (ideally every 6 months) is absolutely essential for your ageing pet. Your pet can experience significant changes in a single year (equivalent to 6-8 human years). A veterinary examination will allow us to pick up on any issues as soon as possible and start treatment if necessary.

Phone us if you have any questions about your senior pet, as we will always be able to give you the best advice.

03 My dog's done his knee!
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It's footy season but your dog doesn't need to be on the sports field to do his ACL!

Rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the knee is one of the most common injuries we see in dogs. This injury can lead to painful arthritis in your dog's knee if it is not treated effectively.

Plenty of dogs will 'snap' the ligament after suddenly jumping off a height or turning quickly. These dogs won't be able to stand on the injured hind leg. Cruciate ligament disease can also be a degenerative condition and older dogs may present with an intermittent lameness and a thickened knee joint.

Veterinary examination of the dog under sedation or general anaesthetic will enable diagnosis of a ruptured ACL (we feel for inappropriate movement of the knee joint). Radiographs will identify any evidence of swelling within and around the joint and any arthritic changes that may indicate progressive disease.

Surgery to stabilise the joint is the best option for treatment. Small dogs may respond to conservative treatment (rest and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication) but due to instability in the joint, there is a high risk that these dogs will develop arthritis and these patients must be carefully managed.

There are different surgical techniques available and we will be able to give you more information on the most suitable type for your dog.

If you think your pet might be injured please call us for advice.

04 Flu season is here
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With flu season in full swing, now's a good time for us to answer the common question, can my pet get the flu?

The answer is yes - but unlike in humans, there isn't really a flu season for dogs and cats and infection can occur at any time of the year.

Dogs might contract canine cough (often referred to incorrectly as kennel cough) and cats can suffer from cat flu (commonly caused by a herpes virus).

Canine cough

Is a highly contagious disease that's passed from dog to dog by moisture droplets. Your dog might be infected at the local park or at a boarding kennel due to the large number of dogs in one area. Vaccination is given annually and is very effective at protecting your pet against the worst strains of this disease.
Your dog may still contract a milder form of canine cough, even if he is vaccinated, but this usually resolves by itself or requires only a short course of antibiotics.

Cat flu

Is also highly contagious and can cause severe illness, especially in elderly cats or kittens. Vaccination is highly effective and while it won't always prevent cats from developing flu, it helps reduce the severity of the condition. Flu vaccinations are given annually and are an important way to help keep your cat stay happy and healthy.

To check if your pet is protected against these diseases, please call us and we can easily look up your pet's vaccination history and give you the best advice.